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Bachelor's in Social Justice Studies (BA)

College of Arts and Sciences

Roosevelt University is proud to offer one of the only social justice studies majors in the country. This interdisciplinary major, housed in the Department of Economics, provides practical and theoretical tools from the fields of economics, history, political science, and sociology to examine theories of and movements for social justice, particularly economic justice. Recent graduates work in government, non-for-profit organizations, and the private sector. Others have gone on to graduate school. Extensive training in writing, research and critical thinking prepare students well for any post-graduate path they choose to take.

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Location: Chicago
Start Term: Fall, Spring
Program Type: Major, Minor

The program allows students to delve into social justice as an academic field of study. Questions about the meaning and causes of injustice and movements for social justice form the core of the curriculum. Its home in the Department of Economics ensures that students receive training in research methods, quantitative and qualitative, that provide the practical and theoretical skills students can apply to careers that make a difference in the world.

Expectations & Requirements

Standards

Students participate in required and elective courses as well as transformational learning and an internship.

Minor Requirements

The Social Justice Studies minor is an interdisciplinary program that integrates theories, methods, and substance of economics, history, political science, and sociology as they bear on questions of social justice.

Sample Courses

  • Intro to Social Justice Studies
  • Economics of Globalization
  • Theories of Social Justice

Outcomes

Possible career options for social justice studies majors include law,teaching, public service, Senate staff, public administration and nonprofit organizational leadership.

Testimonials

"The Englewood neighborhood in Chicago, which has been renowned for its high crime for as long as I can remember, is the place that I called home for the majority of my life. Until the age 19, I never lived more than five miles away from my first home. I grew up witnessing drug deals, crime, and listening to gun shots at night as if they were a lullaby. Yet today, I am a recent college graduate with a job in the career field that I majored in."

Ms. Jordan, an Afghanistan war Veteran, is now working for Senator Dick Durbin in Veteran's Affairs.

Tamara Jordan - Social Justice Studies, BA '16