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Chicago Summer

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Chicago Summer is an integrated learning and living experiential program that allows you to accelerate toward your degree, while still enjoying the summer. 


Stay in our 32-story, award-winning Wabash Building Residence Hall, and discover the many restaurants, parks, museums and festivals all within walking or biking distance. Examine urban development through our two-week courses, and explore the city through faculty-led site visits to Chicago’s neighborhoods, historical landmarks and cultural attractions.

Courses

Students may register for Session A, Session B or both, for 1, 2, 3 or 4 courses.

Session A: July 3 – July 14
Classes meet Monday-Friday and on Saturday, July 8th—no class on Tuesday, July 4th

Summer in the City (CLASS: SOC 214 – CRN: 30725) — Prof. Stephanie Farmer
9 a.m. – 12:45 p.m.

Students will explore Chicago, examining a wide array of dimensions that compose the city’s downtown development, urban sustainability and green development, segregation, ethnic enclaves, gentrification, public housing, public transportation, public schools, community organizations and tourist spectacles. Each topic will be paired with a site visit or field trip, along with visiting a specific site that best exemplifies the topic under examination and discussion.  Students should take away an in-depth understanding of the social forces that shape everyday life in Chicago.

Work & Play in Chicago History (CLASS: HIST 221 – CRN: 30894) — Prof. Margie Rung
9 a.m. – 12:45 p.m.
This course explores the spatial and historical dimensions of Chicago as a workplace and site of leisure.  Students will examine how space and place shaped class solidarity, class conflict and cross-class collaboration, during a period of intense industrialization, urbanization and immigration from the late 19th–early 20th century.  Visiting sites such as Pullman Town and Hull House, along with playgrounds and parks, will illustrate how forces of modernity, combined with individual agency, define new parameters for work and play in the growing metropolis of Chicago.
Sex and Gender in the City (CLASS: WGS 222 – CRN: 31092) — Prof. Marjorie Jolles
1:15 p.m. – 5 p.m.

How does urban space shape sexual and gender identity and experience?  How do sex and gender help to define urban norms and institutions?  What forms of sexual and gendered life are made possible and impossible in the city?  In this course, students explore these questions from a range of perspectives and theories.  These inquiries will be enhanced by pairing course topics with trips to locations around the city of Chicago including visits to archives showcasing feminists, queer culture and history; the maps collection at the Newberry Library; and the Leather Archives and Museum.

Session B:  July 17 – July 28
Classes meet Monday-Friday

Mapping the Urban Arts Scene (CLASS: ART 270 – CRN: 31129) — Prof. Elyse Koren-Camarra
9 a.m. – 12:45 p.m.

Students will be immersed in Chicago’s rich urban art scene with visits to old standards such as the Art Institute of Chicago, and off-beat spaces like Intuit and Wrigleyville’s eclectic sites.  Other visits include the Museum of Contemporary Photography, the Ukrainian Institute of Modern Art, the Chicago Cultural Center, the National Mexican Museum of Fine Art and Chinatown.  Students will create both individual and group art projects, using field trips as inspiration.  Other assignments include journaling, related readings and a web-based writing assignment.

Urban Environmental Justice (CLASS: ACP 250 – CRN: 31057 /CLASS: POS 250 – CRN: 31128) — Prof. Bethany Barratt
1:15 p.m. – 5 p.m.

This course explores some of the natural treasures of Chicago as well as the persistent inequalities in who has access to these treasures.  Chicago has more forest preserves and public green space than any other city in the United States.  Students will also examine the inequalities in exposure to pollution and waste.  Site visits are planned for hidden lakefront preserves, thriving neighborhoods still fighting the legacy of environmental racism, and industrial areas of the far Southeast side that are being reclaimed by nature and green economic development.  Students will gain a deep understanding of how environmental justice is inextricably linked to economic justice, racial justice, gender justice and how to simultaneously work to achieve these goals.

Registration, Housing & Important Dates

Chicago Summer Registration for Current Students

  • Current Roosevelt students may register for Chicago Summer courses as they would register for any other course.  To register, contact your academic advisor. Current students are not required to live on-campus for Chicago Summer. 
  • Applicable tuition and fees  apply.  Contact your financial aid counselor to verify any remaining financial aid funds.
  • For program information, contact Juli Rowen, Assistant Dean, College of Arts & Sciences, at jrowen@roosevelt.edu.

Chicago Summer Registration for Visiting Domestic Students

  • Students who are not actively seeking a degree at Roosevelt University, but would like to enroll in summer courses, may register as a visiting student/student at-large.  There is no application fee.  Applicable tuition and fees do apply. 
  • To register, submit the Undergraduate Student-at-Large Registration Form to the Office of the Registrar.
  • For more information, contact Juli Rowen, Assistant Dean, College of Arts & Sciences, at jrowen@roosevelt.edu.

Chicago Summer Registration for International Students

  • International exchange students may apply for Chicago Summer by completing the application form.
  • To verify if your tuition costs may be included as part of the exchange partnership, contact Dawn Hougland, Assistant Director of International Programs, at dhougland@roosevelt.edu.

Campus Housing

  • Wabash Building Residence Hall is available at the special rate of $50 per day for a minimum stay of 14 days.  Residents will enjoy comfortable shared rooms with stunning views of Chicago's famous lakefront.  Amenities include a full-service dining center, student lounges, fitness center and library privileges.
  • A $500 fee is assessed to cover the cost of a monthly transit pass, some cultural/leisure event admissions and textbooks.
  • Campus housing is optional for local students.

Important Dates

  • May 1: Deadline for course registration and payment of non-refundable $500 deposit.
  • June 1: Housing balance and/or tuition balance (if applicable) due.

For more information, contact: