Ken King

A Roosevelt University professor from St. Charles, Illinois, has received the highest commendation given by the Boy Scouts of America for service to the organization and its youths.

Ken King, professor of elementary education, received scouting’s Silver Buffalo Award – an honor bestowed upon 15 U.S. Presidents, including Franklin Roosevelt, and Bob Hope, Ernie Banks, Neil Armstrong, Marian Wright Edelman and ambassador Andrew Young, to name just a few – in Orlando, Florida on May 26.

A member of the Boy Scouts since his youth, King received the award in part for his work in developing program materials, publications and training curricula for the nationwide Boy Scouts organization.

“It’s easy to say that kids should go camping, but the real issue is to see positive development as a result,” said King, who led program design from the ground up applying Scouting’s first conceptual framework of program outcomes to develop youth into successful leaders and socially conscious citizens.

“Developing a programming framework for scouting is very similar to the work I do at Roosevelt,” said King, who prepares prospective teachers to work with children at the elementary-school level. 

“Scouting has to be able to reach youths through programs that are not only interesting and fun, but which also lead to positive outcomes. That’s the same kind of framework I start from in preparing teachers,” he said.

King is one of the developers and soon-to-be director of a new Elementary Education Teacher Preparation Program that will launch in September at Roosevelt’s Schaumburg Campus.

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