Wabash Building and Auditorium Tower

Roosevelt University's Employee Milestone Recognition Day celebrates the hard work, dedication, and commitment of our employees with ten or more years of service.

At this year's Recognition Day, on October 17, six College of Education employees were honored for their achievement of key milestones:

  • Maria Earmen Stetter, Associate Professor of Special Education and Director of New Deal Teacher Preparation Programs (10 years)
  • Tara Hawkins, Coordinator of Advanced Programs  (15 years)
  • Becky McTague, Associate Professor of Language and Literacy (15 years)
  • Elizabeth Meadows, Associate Professor of Elementary Education (15 years)
  • Judy Gouwens, Associate Professor of Elementary Education (20 years)
  • Gregory Hauser, Professor of Educational Leadership (25 years)

Each honoree has contributed significantly to the creation of a college environment that is diverse, welcoming, and committed to high expectations and social justice. We are fortunate to work side-by-side with such congenial and mission-driven faculty and administrators. Congratulations to all of our 2017 milestone honorees!

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