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Roosevelt Hosts Economics Lecture by Northwestern University President Morton Schapiro and Professor Gary Saul Morson

Arts and Sciences
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2018
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Worldwide, most departments of Economics have invested profusely in mathematical utilitarianism, but not without a cost. In "Cents and Sensibility," Morson and Schapiro make a case that is near and dear to the Roosevelt school: perhaps there is more to learn from economic history, or from an economic study of "Sister Carrie" and "The Grapes of Wrath." Stephen T. Ziliak, PhD Professor of Economics

The Roosevelt Economics Program is hosting a seminar with Morton Schapiro, 16th President of Northwestern University, and Professor Gary Saul Morson of Northwestern University, on Wednesday, April 4 at 4:30 p.m. at Roosevelt University, 430 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago in the Spertus Lounge, Room 244. Schapiro and Morson will discuss Cents and Sensibility: What Economics Can Learn from the Humanities.

“Worldwide, most departments of Economics have invested profusely in mathematical utilitarianism, but not without a cost,” said Roosevelt economics professor Stephen T. Ziliak. “In Cents and Sensibility, Morson and Schapiro make a case that is near and dear to the Roosevelt school: perhaps there is more to learn from economic history, or from an economic study of Sister Carrie and The Grapes of Wrath.

President Schapiro is Professor of Economics in the Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences, with joint appointments in the Kellogg School of Management and the School of Education and Social Policy. An expert on the economics of higher education, he is the author of more than 100 articles and author or editor of nine books. In 2010 he was elected a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and in 2017 he was elected to the National Academy of Education.

Gary Saul Morson is the Lawrence B. Dumas Professor of the Arts and Humanities at Northwestern University, where he is also Professor of Slavic Languages and Literature. Professor Morson has won “best book of the year” awards from the American Comparative Literature Association and the American Association of Teachers of Slavic and East European Languages. He is the lead author of Morson’s and Schapiro’s recent book, Cents and Sensibility: What Economics Can Learn from the Humanities (Princeton, 2017).

The lecture is free and open to the public. For more information, contact Professor Steve Ziliak. Follow Roosevelt's Economics Program on Twitter.

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