Dr. Oluseye K. Onajole completed MSc and PhD degrees from the University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa, and a postdoctoral appointment in the research group of Prof. Alan P. Kozikowski at the University of Illinois at Chicago.  Dr. Onajole’s undergraduate research group focuses on cutting-edge drug discovery research aimed at identifying new small-molecule chemical entities with potent anti-bacterial and anti-mycobacterial properties. Dr. Onajole teaches his research students to design and synthesize organic compounds with potential pharmaceutical applications. Dr. Onajole sees research as an opportunity for students to apply in the laboratory the organic synthesis knowledge they have acquired in the classroom.

As an organic/medicinal chemist, I view research and lab classes as teaching tools which helps bring organic chemistry alive. I help my students to apply literature concepts in their laboratory courses and research. I enjoy working with Roosevelt students because they are passionate about science. My main goal is to nurture this passion from the moment they step into my class or lab. I want my students to experience the fascinating world of organic/medicinal chemistry. Roosevelt University’s modern and well-equipped laboratories and infrastructure also provide an excellent environment for this to happen. Oluseye K. Onajole Assistant Professor of Chemistry

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