Mandy Modic

Modic stepped onstage at the Marriott Theater outside of Chicago in October 2016 to perform in the musical Singin’ in the Rain, and she was ready.

This was not Modic’s first show; in fact, it was far from it. Since graduating from CCPA in 2011 with a concentration in musical theater, Modic performed in a number of plays, including Hairspray, Swing!, A Chorus Line, Les Misérables, Spamalot, The Music Man, Pirates of Penzance, Anything Goes, Seven Brides and 9 to 5.

Shortly after graduation, Modic decided to branch out into television, appearing in episodes of The Middle (2013), and The Playboy Club (2011) as well as one feature length film, When the Lights Go Out (2016).

“It's fun,” Modic said of her experiences off the stage. “I like film, I just don't focus on it.”

Modic said she is addicted to the adrenaline you can only get from a live audience.

“Being able to have the response of an audience, its way different,” Modic said.

It’s a far cry from Modic’s beginnings in her hometown of Coppell, Texas — a Dallas suburb — where she played sports instead of participating in theater.

“I was a sports girl growing up, I was going to go play volleyball in college and probably do math-related things,” Modic said.

“My high school sweetheart was a theater performer,” said Modic.

Modic said she discovered Roosevelt University and the CCPA completely by accident.

“My high school sweetheart was a theater performer … helping him research schools for musical theater, I started to learn about all the different programs and was like, ‘I think I want to do this too,’” Modic said.

When her boyfriend at the time decided to attend Roosevelt, Modic followed.

“I came through here and was so welcomed,” Modic said.

Modic said the small class sizes created a positive learning environment for students and professors that she would not have gotten at a large state school.

“All of my classes were with, by the end, the same 29 people. You really do build a family, which is amazing,” Modic said. “You feel safe to do this vulnerable work in front of your peers because you know everything about each other — there's something great about that.”

Modic said the mentorship and care given by CCPA professors was invaluable.

“You’re able to have that closeness to your professors, where you feel like you're all working together, not ‘Here’s my professor and here's us,’” Modic said. “I think it's neat to feel like we're all working together to accomplish something.”

Modic, who is considering becoming a mentor here at Roosevelt, said she has only one regret from her time at Roosevelt.

“I wish I would have indulged more in the resources I had from my teachers and my classes,” said Modic.

Modic stresses that students should not be afraid to utilize CCPA’s abundant resources, in place to help all current and future young artists succeed in their respective disciplines.

Modic works in Chicago and New York.

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