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Ignite Your Passion for Learning and Leading

Roosevelt Honors Program students are part of a diverse and distinguished community of students who share a love of learning, an interest in being involved in the metropolitan community, and a desire to be leaders. 

Honors students carry out their own independent projects, engage in challenging courses, collaborate with faculty members to conduct research, and explore their world through transformative educational experiences. The lively Student Honors Organization develops a strong sense of community for students, and it is an outlet for socializing and participating in community-based projects. 

Small courses taught by dedicated faculty are tailored to Honors students' interests and abilities

  • A range of subjects are covered in Honors seminars every year. Past offerings include a Political Science course on transportation (S13), a Spanish course on immigration issues (F12), an English class on Chicago literature (S12), an Education course about the special challenges and opportunities of public school in cities (S12), a Sustainability Studies course (S12), a Gender Studies course about the politics of fashion (F11), and Psychology course about youth violence prevention (S11).
  • Honors students can apply to take the yearly Newberry Library Seminar, with students from DePaul, UIC, and Loyola. Topics change each year, and students work in the Newberry's exceptional archives.
  • Faculty-led study abroad trips linked to Honors courses are taken every other year. Recent classes visited London and South Africa.

Research experiences prepare students to excel in professions and graduate programs 

  • Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP) matches students as paid research assistants on faculty members’ research projects in any discipline at the University. Recent UROP projects have been based in Biology, Psychology, Political Science, History, and Education.
  • The required thesis project gives Honors students a chance to become experts on a topic in which they are personally invested.
  • Honors students can be paired with mentors for support in achieving their professional and academic goals.

Honors students build a community of dedicated student leaders

  • The Student Honors Organization holds social events and service projects.
  • Supplemental advising to support your academic career and long term goals.
  • Honors students have access to a private lounge for studying, working, and holding meetings.
  • Your Honors advisor provides information and support for your applications for fellowships and scholarships.

The Honors Program Curriculum

The Honors program is designed to be completed during the course of your regular enrollment at Roosevelt; the tuition for Honors students is the same as for non-Honors students, and the course of study takes the same amount of time.

Honors at Roosevelt offers opportunities for enriched, challenging work and different courses, not more courses. Honors courses can even count toward your major and your general distribution requirements.

For students entering the Honors Program as freshmen, the program curriculum consists of a ten-course sequence. Students who enroll in the Honors Program after their freshmen year will take fewer courses, depending on how many credits they have already completed.  The program will be tailored specifically for each student.

The curriculum includes a core set of courses in creative writing and critical thinking in addition to a selection of specialty courses. 

As an Honors student you take Honors versions of some general education requirements, including the ACP series. “ACP” stands for “Academic Communities of Practice,” and ACP courses will prepare you to understand and contribute to discussions about significant social issues and intellectual concerns. These courses will introduce you to the key concepts and perspectives that are part of a broad liberal arts education, and everyone at Roosevelt completes some ACP coursework.  English 222-99 includes advanced practice in writing and training as a writing counselor. Honors students tutor others in writing at one of several locations, either on or off-campus. The specific Seminar Courses offered will vary by semester.  Honors students consult with each semester’s Class Schedule and their advisor for the most current listings.

ACP 101 (“First Year Seminar”)
Fall, First year

 

 

Honors Seminar Elective
(topics change every semester)

 

 

ACP 110 (“Primary Texts”)
Spring, first year

 

Honors Seminar Elective

 

 

ACP 250 (“Grounds for Change”)
Sophomore, Junior, or Senior Year

 

Honors Seminar Elective

 

 

English 222-99 (“Writing About Ideas”)
Sophomore, Junior, or Senior Spring

 

Honors Seminar Elective

 

 

Honors 399-99 (“Thesis Credits”)
Senior Year—not a course, independent work

 

Honors Seminar Elective

 

 

Students complete the honors program with an independent thesis, researched and written under the close guidance of faculty members. This capstone is very flexible, and students determine the area and content of their project in consultation with their faculty mentor.

 

New in Fall 2012: Honors Track in Psychology

Students majoring in Psychology now have the option of focusing their Honors work within that department. The curriculum for the Honors Track in Psych is very similar to the standard Honors requirements: 

ACP 101 (“First Year Seminar”)
Fall, First year

Honors Seminar Elective
(topics change every semester)

 

 

ACP 110 (“Primary Texts”)
Spring, first year

 

Honors Psychology Seminar Elective

 

 

ACP 250 (“Grounds for Change”)
Sophomore, Junior, or Senior Year

 

Honors Psychology Seminar Elective

 

 

English 222-99 (“Writing About Ideas”)
Sophomore, Junior, or Senior Spring

 

Honors Seminar Elective

 

 

Psychology 399-99 ("Directed Research")
Senior Year- not a course, one-on-one work with a faculty mentor

 

Honors 399-99 (“Thesis Credits”)
Senior Year—not a course, independent work; follows Psych 399-99

 

 

Joining Honors

The Roosevelt Honors Program encourages all students who have been involved in their communities and schools and maintained strong academic records to apply to join Honors.  


The process begins when you complete the Undergraduate Application for Admission and send it to the campus you wish to attend.  After your Honors Program application and academic record have been approved by the director, you may be invited to participate in an interview with the director or faculty and staff members.

When you are admitted to Honors, you will meet with Megan Bernard, Assistant Director of Honors, for advising, academic planning, and your orientation to the program. 

For additional information, contact:

Sam Rosenberg, Vice Provost for Faculty and Academic Administration
312-341-3697 or srosenbe@roosevelt.edu

or

Megan Bernard, Assistant Director of Honors
312-341-3685 or mbernard03@roosevelt.edu