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Course Details


BIOL 301 - CELLULAR & MOLECULAR BIOLOGY

Biological principles relating to cellular and subcellular levels of organization. Topics include introductory biochemistry, cell biology and ultrastructure, and cell physiology. Laboratory includes cloning methods. Lecture, laboratory, and discussion.

Credits: 2-3


BIOL 302 - DIVERSITY AND EVOLUTION

Darwin, The Origin of Species, evolution through natural selection, population genetics, speciation, history of the earth, progression of life through the ages, human origins. Open to well-prepared nonmajors.

Credits: 3


BIOL 310 - FUND OF BEHAVIOR NEUROSCIENCE

Complex behaviors are possible because of the brain. Our goal is to understand this complex organ. Fundamentals of neural communication, organization, and basic neuroanatomy will be covered. Sensory systems will be introduced as models of neural organization.

Credits: 3


BIOL 314 - QUANT. ECOLOGY & CONSERVA

Designing ecological experiments to answer critical questions about climate change, urbanization, ecosystem processes and conservation. This course will be skill-based with a focus around experimental designs, experimental manipulation, emphasizing statistical analyses, intensive field and laboratory exercises, and scientific report writing. Lectures and discussions will review current information on climate change and ecosystem processes in the context of current paradigms of global conservation. Lecture and Laboratory.

Credits: 5 (Lecture: 2 + Lab: 3)


BIOL 315 - ECOLOGY

Interactions among organisms and between organisms and the environment. Population growth, competition, predator-prey relationships, mutualism, species diversity, dispersal, succession, nutrient cycles, and energy flow through ecosystems. Lecture, discussion, and field projects.

Credits: 2-3


BIOL 316 - INTEGRATIVE ECOLOGY THINK TANK

This intensive course is for upper level undergraduates who have a keen interest in developing sound skills in ecologically related research. Students identify a research question and hypotheses, develop proposals, implement their project, analyze data, develop oral presentation skills and write a paper for potential publication. Students will work with the professor as well as have opportunities to receive feedback on their work from key scientific professionals at premier local research institutions in Chicago

Credits: 3


BIOL 322 - BOTANY

Study of the major plant groups, their classification and taxonomy, the anatomy used to identify species. Ethno-botanical importance (e.g. medicinal uses), anatomy, morphology and ecology of plant species will be emphasized. Ecological and economic importance of weedy and invasive species in an ecosystem context will be discussed. Principles of classifying seed plants by families will be introduced in the field and in the herbarium at The Field Museum.

Credits: 4


BIOL 323 - Tropical Marine Biology

Exploration of tropical habitats, both marine and terrestrial, in terms of basic biology and ecology and current threats due to development. Emphasis is on coral reefs, including snorkeling of the second largest barrier reef in the world off Ambergris Caye in Belize, with opportunities to observe diverse wildlife in the field. Terrestrial field trips include beaches, mangrove swamps, and tropical deciduous forests. Visits to Mayan ruins and the Belize Zoo on the mainland emphasize local cultural ties to the environment.

Credits: 2


BIOL 324 - MARINE BIOLOGY

Physical forces, biodiversity, organismal function, and ecological interactions that form marine environments. The principles of cell biology, organismic physiology, biomechanics, and ecology applied to marine biological problems.

Credits: 3


BIOL 332 - ECOLOGY OF TALLGRASS PRAIRIE

Prairies have been described as the most endangered ecosystems in North America. This is a field-oriented introduction to prairies, including exploration of unique ecological processes found at the population, community, and ecosystem levels. Special attention will be given to prairie plants, insects, soils, endangered species, and prairie restoration.

Credits: 4


BIOL 333 - NAT'L PARKS FIELD EXPERIENCE

The course focuses on a field experience that combines the study of natural sciences and resource management of National Parks. This includes understanding the connections between the geology, land use, wildlife, public policy, and politics associated with the National Parks. An overnight field experience will immerse students in a National Parks environment and provide opportunities to interact with National Park Service staff.

Credits: 4


BIOL 336 - Introduction to Neuroscience

Basic anatomy and physiology of the nervous system, neurotransmitters, ion channel, sensory systems and diseases of the nervous system.

Credits: 3


BIOL 339 - EVOLUTIONARY PHYSIOLOGY

Learning to approach animal physiology from an evolutionary perspective. This course covers mechanisms by which animals perform life-sustaining functions, the evolution and adaptive significance of physiological traits, the diversity of physiological mechanisms, and how physiology and the environment interact. Laboratory involves dissection and study of physiological traits in a variety of different animals as well as experiments on the adaptive significance of traits.

Credits: 2-3


BIOL 340 - APPLICATIONS IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Capstone course for the Environmental Science minor, this course explores various applications of environmental science related to biological systems, environmental chemistry and physical processes, including environmental toxicology, sampling methods, indicator species, and standard laboratory practices, protocols,and quality assurance.

Credits: 2-3


BIOL 350 - CANCER BIOLOGY

This course provides students with knowledge of the fundamental principles of the molecular and cellular biology of cancer cells. Biology of Cancer is designed to illustrate basic aspects of cancer development, and to discuss how molecular genetic approaches can be used to reveal fundamental processes of carcinogenesis. Lectures and demonstrations explain the role of growth factors, oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, angiogenesis, and signal transduction mechanisms in tumor formation. Discussion of aspects of cancer epidemiology, prevention, and principles of drug action in cancer management is part of the course.

Credits: 3


BIOL 351 - GENERAL GENETICS

Classical and molecular genetics. Transmission genetics, chromosome genetics, interaction of genes with sex and environment, mapping, DNA structure and replication, transcription, translation, chromosome structure and genome organization, extrachromosomal inheritance, mutagenesis, gene expression. Genetics of plants, insects, vertebrates, fungi, bacteria, and viruses.

Credits: 2-3


BIOL 353 - MOLECULAR BIOLOGY

The structure of nucleic acids and chromosomes, DNA replication and repair, general and site-specific recombination, control of gene expression at the transcriptional and translational levels, oncogenes and retroviruses. Laboratory techniques include PCR, DNA fingerprinting, and DNA sequencing. Included in the biotechnology certificate program. Lecture, laboratory, and discussion.

Credits: 2-3


BIOL 356 - DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY

Basic principles and processes of embryology and development; selected invertebrates, vertebrates, and plants.

Credits: 3


BIOL 358 - CELL BIOLOGY

Molecular interactions that provide the foundation for the structure and functions of the cell. Topics include protein structure and function, membrane transport, post-translational modifications of proteins and protein secretion, cell cycle regulation, cell signaling and mechanisms of development and differentiation. Laboratory techniques include SDS-PAGE, cell fractionation, bacterial protein expression and purification, and immunohistochemistry. Included in the biotechnology certificate program. Lecture, laboratory and discussion.

Credits: 2-3


BIOL 360 - MICROBIOLOGY

Structure and function of prokaryotic cells, including metabolic and genetic diversity; emphasis on differences and similarities with eukaryotes. Roles microbes play in human body, soil, and water ecosystems. Special emphasis on human diseases and microbial processes for the maintenance of biosphere. Applications to medicine, biotechnology, food processing, agriculture, pollution control. Laboratory includes proficient and safe handling of microorganisms, identification of unknown bacteria, and biochemical and microscopic methods. Included in the biotechnology certificate program.

Credits: 2-3


BIOL 361 - INFORMATION TECH FOR SCIENCES

Methods for finding biological and biotechnological information. Online and hard copy methods with an emphasis on the use of various computer databases and the Internet.

Credits: 3


BIOL 362 - DATA MINING IN LIFE SCIENCES

The advent of high throughput techniques in biology and chemistry requires a data mining approach to discover new knowledge form these large data sets. Data mining techniques allow an investigator to understand the collection of data and then to classify and/or make predictions form the data. It is a combination of statistical, informatic and other analytical techniques. This course is designed to be an introduction to data mining techniques for biolgists. Exampes will be drawn from genomic, proteomic and eidemologic data sets.

Credits: 3


BIOL 364 - PROTEIN STRUCTURE DETERM.

Computer methods for converting electron microscopy of purified proteins into 3D protein structures.

Credits: 3


BIOL 365 - AQUATIC TOXICOLOGY

This course will explore the world of anthropogenic toxicants: harmful elements or compounds whose level in the environment is increased by human activities. The course will take a look at toxicants as they are released by human activities, enter and move through the aquatic system, chemically react with natural measures of water quality, interact and are taken up by living organisms and ultimately cause some kind of harmful effect at the cellular, individual, population and community levels. Students will be expected to research and present information on major topics in aquatic toxicology to the class, expanding the class base of knowledge and contributing to a "living textbook" of toxicological information.

Credits: 3


BIOL 367 - IMMUNOLOGY

Humoral and cellular immune responses, generation of immune diversity, autoimmune and immunodeficiency diseases. Immunologic assays relevant to clinical settings. Laboratory techniques include antibody-antigen interactions, ELISA, and the purification of lymphocyte populations. Included in the biotechnology certificate program. Lecture, laboratory, and discussion.

Credits: 2-3


BIOL 369 - CONSERVATION BIOL: AFRICA

Conservation Biology"”Tropical Africa is a 10 day, field-based course that will largely be carried out in the Amani Nature Reserve, Tanzania, where Dr. Norbert Cordeiro (Roosevelt University) and Dr. Henry Ndangalasi (University of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania) have been working since 1998. Field work will include (i) conducting applied ecological studies relevant to conservation in the area, (ii) discussing and problem-solving issues of poverty and conservation affecting human access to resources, (iii) meeting with Tanzanian stakeholders to gain an appreciation of the complexities of the solutions required to conserve one of the world's most important forests. Students will also spend 2 days in a savannah habitat at one of Tanzania's premier national parks. This course will involve designing ecological experiments, experimental manipulation, statistical analyses, intensive field and laboratory exercises, and scientific report writing.

Credits: 2-3


BIOL 371 - THE BIOLOGY OF AGING

The biological relationships between the normal activities of life and aging. Changes in structure and function at various levels of biological organization (subcellular population) with age. Lectures, expert guest speakers, student seminars, term paper.

Credits: 3


BIOL 375 - GENERAL PHYSIOLOGY

An examination of the structure and functioning of biological systems in light chemical and physical principles. Homeostatic mechanisms, neuromuscular physiology, endocrine physiology will be emphasized. Graphical and statistical analyses of laboratory experimental results will illuminate physiological systems.

Credits: 2-3


BIOL 380 - NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUM STUDIES

Introduction to museum studies; in-depth study of biodiversity with opportunities to work with scientists in selected areas of genetics, botany and zoology.

Credits: 3


BIOL 391 - MEDICAL INTERNSHIP

Off-campus experience at area medical facility. Rotation through at least five medical specialties at a hospital or an approved medical or biomedical research or clinical facility. At least 12 contact hours.

Credits: 3-6


BIOL 392 - RESEARCH IN BIOLOGY

Independent science laboratory research experience under the guidance of a faculty researcher; 1 to 4 semester hours total may be applied toward the BS degree. Students may register in consecutive semesters.

Credits: 1-4


BIOL 393 - VETERINARY INTERNSHIP

Off-campus experience with a veterinarian or veterinary clinic.

Credits: 1-3


BIOL 395 - INDEPENDENT STUDY

Independent library research culminating in a formal review paper on a topic approved by the instructor.

Credits: 1-3


BIOL 396 - BIOLOGY INTERNSHIP

Internship off-campus related to the biological sciences. A maximum of 3 SH can be taken.

Credits: 1-3