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Meet the Faculty

English and Creative Writing Faculty

 E. Mairin Barney

Barney, Mairin embarney@roosevelt.edu
Faculty site: http://sites.roosevelt.edu/embarney
College of Arts and Sciences
Literature and Languages
Lecturer in English Composition
  Chicago phone: 312-341-6779
  Chicago room: AUD734

Mairin Barney has been teaching full time in RU’s composition program since 2009.  She earned her BA in English and Philosophy from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign in 2001, followed by her MA in Literature from Northern Arizona University in 2004.  Her research interests include composition pedagogy, feminist theory, modernism, and American culture and identity.


Kyle Beachy  Beachy, Kyle  kbeachy@roosevelt.edu  
Faculty site: http://sites.roosevelt.edu/kbeachy/  
College of Arts and Sciences
Literature and Languages
Assistant Professor of English and Creative Writing
Chicago phone: 312-341-2221
Chicago room: AUD739 

 

Kyle Beachy is an Assistant Professor of English and Creative writing. He earned his B.A. in Philosophy and English from Pomona College and his M.F.A. from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Beyond introductory and advanced creative writing, his primary teaching interests involve late-twentieth century American authors such as Don DeLillo, David Foster Wallace, Lydia Davis, David Markson, along with authors of cyberpunk science fiction and theory. He is the author of the novel The Slide (The Dial Press, 2009) and his short fiction has appeared in Pank, Hobart, Another Chicago Magazine, The Collagist, as a Featherproof Mini-Book and elsewhere. He has also published numerous book reviews and essays on contemporary literature in St. Louis Magazine, The Chicagoan, The Collagist, and the anthology, The Late American Novel: Writers on the Future of Books. Along with ongoing publication of short fiction, he is currently at work on a second novel. 


Brecke, Carrie cbrecke@roosevelt.edu
Faculty site: sites.roosevelt.edu/cbrecke/
College of Arts and Sciences
Department of Literature and Languages
Instructor in English and Women's & Gender Studies
Director of University Writing Center 
Chicago phone: 312-322-7141 
Chicago room: AUD 650 

Carrie Brecke is the Director of the Writing Center and an Instructor in English and Women’s and Gender Studies. Her areas of interest are Critical Theory and Pedagogy, Composition Theory, Feminist Theory, and Sexuality and Literature. In English, she has taught myriad courses from beginning and advanced writing courses to Critical Theory and Practice. In Women’s and Gender Studies, she has most recently taught “Feminist Theories of the Body,” “Ecofeminism,” and “Feminist Theories of Violence.” She has a Master’s Degree in English from the University of Illinois at Chicago and twenty years of experience in teaching and Writing Center administration. Currently, she is working on three projects: Beyond Identity: Peerness as a Tutoring Strategy; The Rhetorics of Privilege in Al Gore’s Inconvenient Truth; and a novel. Her co-authored bibliography, “Dynamics of the Pluralistic Classroom: A Selected Bibliography,” recently appeared in the co-edited NWSAJ Retrospective Anthology on Feminist Pedagogy, which was published last year by Johns Hopkins University Press.


Brigham, Ann abrigham@roosevelt.edu
Faculty site: sites.roosevelt.edu/abrigham/
College of Arts and Sciences
Department of Literature and Languages
Associate Professor of English &Women's and Gender Studies
Director, Women's and Gender Studies Program
Chicago phone: 312-341-3725
Chicago room: AUD 476-B

Ann Brigham holds a B.A. in English from Bard College in New York, and an M.A. and Ph.D. in English from The University of Arizona. She teaches 20th- and 21st-century American literature and culture, women’s and gender studies, and writing. Recent upper-level course offerings include Contemporary Native American Literature, Gender and Mobility in American Women’s Fiction, Gender, Sexuality, and Popular Culture, and American Gothic Literature. Her research focuses on two areas, which often intersect: the analysis of representations of space and place in American literature, film, and popular culture, and the examination of cultural narratives of gender and sexuality, especially those of heteronormativity. She has published articles on constructions of the Western American landscape in the films Mi Vida Loca and Terminator 2, geographic scale in Leslie Marmon Silko’s novel Almanac of the Dead, heterosexual unions and touristic spaces in Henry James’ novel The Bostonians, and going “behind the scenes” at Universal Studios theme park and the Ford Rouge Factory as well as in the film Jurassic Park. She is co-editor of Making Worlds: Gender, Metaphor, Materiality and is currently writing a book on the ways American road narratives imagine, illuminate, and interrogate mobility as an ideological and spatial practice. 


Buccola, Regina rbuccola@roosevelt.edu
Faculty site: sites.roosevelt.edu/rbuccola/
College of Arts and Sciences
Department of Literature and Languages
Associate Professor of English
Chicago phone: 312-341-2400
Chicago room: AUD 742

Regina Buccola earned a BA in English from Bellarmine University, an MA in English literature from the University of Kentucky, and a Ph.D. in English from the University of Illinois at Chicago. Her research interests and teaching areas include Shakespearean-era drama, twentieth-century feminist drama, feminist literary and performance theory, and British and American poetry. Buccola has published essays on British Renaissance drama in Sixteenth-Century Journal, Early Theatre Journal, the online journal Borrowers and Lenders, and in several essay collections. She is the author of Fairies, Fractious Women and the Old Faith: Fairy Lore in Early Modern British Drama and Culture (Susquehanna University Press, 2006), the editor of A Midsummer Night's Dream: A Critical Guide (Continuum Press, 2009), and co-editor with Lisa Hopkins of Marian Moments in Early Modern Drama (Ashgate Press, 2007). Buccola has published poetry in a variety of regional journals as well as a chapbook, Conjuring (Finishing Line Press, 2009). She has written, directed, and performed in original pieces at Link's Hall, Live Bait Theater, No Exit Café, The Writer's Workspace, and at various art galleries and museums throughout Chicago.  With fellow Roosevelt instructor Joe Fedorko, she is a founding member of the political sketch comedy troupe Democracy Burlesque.


Bonnie Gunzenhauser

Gunzenhauser, Bonnie J. bgunzenhauser@roosevelt.edu
Faculty site: sites.roosevelt.edu/bgunzenhauser/
College of Arts and Sciences
Department of Literature and Languages
Interim Dean, College of Arts and Sciences
Associate Professor of English
Chicago phone: 312-341-2074
Chicago room: AUD 620

Bonnie Gunzenhauser (Interim Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and Associate Professor of English) earned the B.A. in English, philosophy, and political science from Luther College, and the M.A. and Ph.D. in English from the University of Chicago. Her teaching interests include eighteenth-century and British Romantic literature; recent courses have focused on early mass media, the novel, Jane Austen, and revolutionary literature. She also teaches courses in literary and cultural theory, pedagogy, and approaches to reading and writing. She recently published Reading in History: New Methodologies from the Anglo-American Tradition (Pickering & Chatto, 2010), and her scholarship has also appeared in edited collections, in encyclopedias, and in such journals as Modern Philology, Eighteenth-Century Studies, Keats-Shelley Journal, and Prose Studies, and College Literature. Her current research focuses on how literacy shapes political and cultural identity, both in Romantic-era Britain and today. Gunzenhauser served as chair of Roosevelt’s Department of Literature and Languages from 2005-2012.


Howe, Lawrence lhowe@roosevelt.edu
Faculty site: sites.roosevelt.edu/lhowe/
College of Arts and Sciences
Department of Literature and Languages
Department Chair
Professor of English
Chicago phone: 312-341-3709
Chicago room: AUD 520B

Larry Howe (BA and Ph.D. University of California at Berkeley) teaches American literature and film studies. He is the author of Mark Twain and the Novel: The Double-Cross of Authority, published in the Cambridge Series on American Literature and Culture, and is a contributor to the Oxford Mark Twain. He has published numerous articles on topics as varied as politics and grief in the AIDS Quilt, the mythographic impulse in the films of presidential library museums, as well as on more standard literary critical issues such as Poe's detective fiction. His more recent research engages with his teaching of film studies and includes articles on the adaptation of radical Canadian drama in John Greyson’s award-winning film Lilies, reflexivity in Hitchcock’s Rear Window, and Charlie Chaplin's conflicts with technology in Modern Times. He is currently at work on a book that examines the problem of property in Mark Twain’s fiction. When not occupied in these activities, he plays mandolin in the world music group, Compass Rose quintet.


O'Brien, Ellen eobrien@roosevelt.edu 
Faculty site: sites.roosevelt.edu/eobrien/
College of Arts and Sciences
Department of Literature and Languages
Associate Professor of English & Women’s and Gender Studies
Director, Women’s and Gender Studies 
Chicago phone: 312-341-3723 
Chicago room: AUD 736-A

Ellen O’Brien holds a B.A. in English from St. Mary's University in San Antonio, and an M.A. and a Ph.D. in English literature from the University of Connecticut. Her teaching interests include nineteenth and twentieth-century English and Irish literature, gender studies and feminist theory, and postcolonial literature and theory. Her recent upper-level course offerings include “Crime in Victorian Literature,” “Contemporary Irish Women’s Writing and the Politics of Gender,” and “Imagining Terror.”  Her recently published book, Crime in Verse: The Poetics of Murder in the Victorian Era (OSU Press 2008), examines how the generic and formal elements of poetry were used to comment on the conflicting discourses of crime and punishment in the Victorian era.


Ji-Hyae Park

Park, Ji-Hyae jpark@roosevelt.edu
Faculty site: sites.roosevelt.edu/jpark/
College of Arts and Sciences
Literature and Languages
Lecturer in English Composition
Chicago phone: 312-341-6777
Chicago room: AUD 734

Ji-Hyae Park is a full-time Lecturer of Composition for the English department here at Roosevelt University.  She taught composition as well as literature courses previously at the University of Michigan, where she received her Ph.D. in English in 2008.  Although she wrote her dissertation on Victorian aesthetic criticism, her interests have shifted recently to autobiographical comics.  Her composition courses at Roosevelt have explored topics ranging from the challenges of ethnographical research, trauma studies, and visual theories.


Perkins, Priscilla pperkins@roosevelt.edu
Faculty site: sites.roosevelt.edu/pperkins/
College of Arts and Sciences
Department of Literature and Languages
Associate Professor of English
Associate Dean
Chicago phone: 312-341-2283
Chicago room: AUD 626

Associate Professor Priscilla Perkins received a B.A. in English from The Colorado College, an M.A. from Columbia University, and a Ph.D. from Rutgers University.  Her current research explores how students’ academic success relates to the storehouse of cultural allusions and commonplaces they do (or don’t) possess when they begin college.  She is particularly concerned to bring the writing and interpretive skills of students from working-class, minority, and conservative religious backgrounds into a more respectful and reciprocal relationship with so-called “mainstream” literacies. She teaches Composition Theory courses like “Common Knowledge and Cultural Capital,” as well as American literature courses like “Documentary Realisms” and “Gender and the Artist.” She is the co-author of the influential composition anthology Literacies: Reading, Writing, Interpretation (W.W. Norton, 2001), and has published articles on language difference in basic writing classrooms and the relationship between Christian fundamentalism, hermeneutic theory, and composition pedagogy. In her role as Associate Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, Priscilla Perkins supervises the General Education curriculum for undergraduates. With Nona M. Burney, she co-wrote “Distributed Leadership: A Tool for Creating Learning Outcomes and Transforming Curriculum,” part of A Process Approach to General Education Reform (Atwood, 2010).


Ruffin, Kimberly kruffin@roosevelt.edu
College of Arts and Sciences
Department of Literature and Languages
Associate Professor of English
Interim Associate Provost for Research and Graduate Studies
Chicago phone: 312-341-2281
Chicago room: AUD 739

Kimberly Ruffin (Ph.D., University of Illinois at Chicago) investigates art’s relationship to cultural expression, ecological awareness, and social justice.  Her research and teaching areas include ecological, African-American, and non-U.S. Africana literature and culture.  She enjoys making experiential and service-learning parts of her pedagogical approach. Her writing has appeared both in academic journals such as African-American Review, CLA Journal, and Obsidian III and the anthologies Black Geographies and the Politics of Place and Humanity at the Turning Point: Rethinking Nature, Culture, and Freedom.  Awarded an American Association of University Women Postdoctoral Research Leave Fellowship for her research in ecoliterature, she authored the monograph Black on Earth: African-American Ecoliterary Traditions (University of Georgia Press).  As a Green Horizon Magazine Column Chief (“Ecology and Human Natures”), she creates and solicits writing which explores how human cultures reflect ideas about nature.


Sheldon Walcher

Walcher, Sheldon swalcher@roosevelt.edu
Faculty site: sites.roosevelt.edu/swalcher/
College of Arts and Sciences
Department of Literature and Languages
Assistant Professor 
Schaumburg phone: 847-330-4520
Schaumburg room:SCH600R

Sheldon Walcher serves as Director of the Composition Program at Roosevelt University, and holds a double BA in literature and philosophy from the University of California at Santa Cruz; an MFA in creative writing from Penn State University; and a Ph.D. in rhetoric and composition from the University of Utah. His research interests include writing program administration, critical discourse analysis, the history of rhetoric, and composition studies. Specifically, he is interested in how various “rules” (often unspoken) in communities function to regulate who gets to write, about what, when, and how; and how “unconventional” discourses can challenge social, political and cultural boundaries.  He is currently working on two book projects -- a textbook called Writing With Power: A Social Rhetoric, and Riddled: Error, Productivity and Change in Discourse. In addition to writing and teaching, Sheldon is an avid traveler, and has lived in or visited over 500 cities in 30 countries on six continents.


Wondra, Janet jwondra@roosevelt.edu
Faculty site: sites.roosevelt.edu/jwondra/
College of Arts and Sciences
Department of Literature and Languages
Associate Professor of English & Film Studies
Chicago phone: 312-341-3770
Chicago room: AUD758

Janet Wondra holds a BA in philosophy from UCLA, an MA in English and creative writing from San Francisco State University, and two degrees from Louisiana State University: an MFA in poetry and a Ph.D. in American literature and film theory. An award-winning film and video maker, she has screened her work at film festivals and museums in the United States and Europe. Her poetry and creative nonfiction have appeared in such journals as The Southern Review, Denver Quarterly, Michigan Quarterly Review, and The Christian Science Monitor as well as in Short Takes: Brief Encounters with Contemporary Nonfiction and In the Middle of the Middle West: Literary Nonfiction from the Heartland. Her scholarly work has appeared in Wide Angle, The Faulkner Journal, Journal of Film and Video, ADE Bulletin, and International Journal of the Humanities. Her teaching emphasizes cultural and gender representations in film and literature, and she has a particular interest in issues of region and race in American modernism. Before arriving at Roosevelt, she taught at the University of Georgia, LSU, San Francisco State, and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.


Amanda Wornhoff

Wornhoff, Amanda awornhoff@roosevelt.edu
Faculty site: sites.roosevelt.edu/awornhoff/
College of Arts and Sciences
Department of Literature and Languages
Interim Director of English Composition
Lecturer in English Composition
Chicago phone: 312-341-6776
Chicago room: AUD 736

Amanda Wornhoff is a Lecturer in English Composition, and an alumna of Roosevelt University.  She earned her BGS in Liberal Studies and her MA in English at Roosevelt in 2005 and 2008, respectively.  She has most recently taught Intro to Composition, a course rooted in inviting students to read and respond to challenging texts, and Argument, Analysis and Research, where students have the opportunity to explore the nature of work and education in today’s culture.


Spanish Language and Literature Faculty

Archibald, Priscilla parchibald@roosevelt.edu
Faculty site: sites.roosevelt.edu/parchibald/
College of Arts and Sciences
Department of Literature and Languages
Assistant Professor of Spanish
Chicago phone: 312-341-6453
Chicago room: AUD 719

Priscilla Archibald is an Assistant Professor of Spanish. She earned an M.A. degree at the University of Chicago and a Ph.D. at Stanford University. Her areas of expertise include Andean studies, Hemispheric studies, Postcolonial theory, modern Latin American literature, and the work of Jose Maria Arguedas. Her research interests and teaching areas include Hemispheric Studies and Andean Studies, as well as Transatlantic Studies, Postcolonial literature, urbanization, poetry, and modern Latin American literature. Recently, Archibald has taught courses on Europe and the Americas, Politics and Sexuality in Latin America, Cesar Vallejo and Pablo Neruda, and Cosmopolitanism. Her scholarly work has appeared in the journals Social Text, Revista Iberoamericana, and Confluencia. Archibald is the sole author of the book Imagining Modernity in the Andes (Bucknell, 2010). Currently, she is working on a book that deals with a hemispheric approach to the avant-garde and is also working on the issue of religion and secularism.