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Meet The Faculty

Early Modern Europe

Modern Europe

United States

Latin America

Emeriti Faculty


Celeste_Chamberland

Celeste Chamberland
Associate Professor
Early Modern Europe
cchamberland@roosevelt.edu

College of Arts and Sciences
Department of History and Philosophy
Chicago phone: 312-341-3726
Chicago room: AUD 836B

Celeste Chamberland holds a B.A. from the University of New Brunswick, an M.A. from Concordia University in Montreal, Canada, and a Ph.D. in History from the University of California, Davis. Specializing in early modern European social and cultural history, Tudor-Stuart England, and the history of medicine, her teaching interests include urban history, gender history, and the history of disease and public health. She has held Teaching Fellowships at the Newberry Library and has received grants from The William Andrews Clark Research Library, Roosevelt University, and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. Her publications include articles in Sixteenth Century Journal, History of Education Quarterly, Social History of Medicine, and Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences. Currently, she is working on a book-length study that explores the relationship between gender, civic culture, and the professional identity of surgeons in early modern London. She is also developing a research project that explores cultural constructions of pain and nascent concepts of palliative care in Elizabethan England. Her future research plans include an assessment of attitudes toward disability in sixteenth-century England and a study of the role played by Huguenot physicians in London, with a particular emphasis on Theodore Turquet de Mayerne, royal physician to James I and Charles I.


Chris_Chulos

Chris J. Chulos
Associate Dean, College of Arts and Sciences
Associate Professor
Modern Europe
cchulos@roosevelt.edu
http://sites.roosevelt.edu/cchulos/
College of Arts and Sciences
Department of History and Philosophy
Chicago phone: 312-341-3711
Chicago room: AUD 616
 

Chris Chulos received his B.A. from Loyola University Chicago and M.A. and Ph.D. from The University of Chicago. Between 1994 and 2002, he was a research fellow and faculty member at the Renvall Institute for Area and Cultural Studies (now the Department of World Cultures) and in the Department of Philosophy, History, Culture, and Art at the University of Helsinki, Finland, where he remains a permanent member of the faculty. During the 2012-2013 academic year Professor Chulos will serve as a faculty ambassador for the PromoDoc Ambassador's Network, a European Union initiative to increase awareness of doctoral-level study in Europe.  At Roosevelt he teaches courses on Modern European Social and Cultural History. His publications include Converging Worlds: Religion and Community in Peasant Russia, 1861-1917 (DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University Press, 2003), Imperial and National Identities in Pre-Revolutionary, Soviet, and Post-Soviet Russia, co-edited with Johannes Remy (Helsinki: Finnish Literature Society, 2001), The Fall of an Empire, the Birth of a Nation: National Identities in Russia (Nationalism and Fascism in Russia), co-edited with Timo Piirainen, (Aldershot:  Ashgate, 2000), and many articles about religion and culture in nineteenth century Russia. He has held visiting positions at the Kennan Institute of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, D.C., the School of Slavonic and East European Studies at the University College London, St. Petersburg University (Russia), and University of Eastern Finland and Tampere University (Finland). He has been a Fulbright scholar and IREX exchangee, as well as a recipient of grants from the European Union, the Finnish Academy of Sciences, and the Russian Academy of Sciences. His current work concentrates on history and memory in late imperial Russia, with an emphasis on early Russian cinema.


Sandra_Frink

Sandra Frink
Associate Professor
U.S. History
sfrink@roosevelt.edu
 
http://sites.roosevelt.edu/sfrink/
College of Arts and Sciences
Department of History and Philosophy
Chicago phone: 312-341-6474
Chicago room: AUD 840

 

Sandra Frink holds a B.A. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, an M.A. from the University of Memphis, and a Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin. Her teaching and research interests include the study of public space, particularly in urban environments, the history of women, gender and sexuality, the history of immigration and ethnicity, African American history, and the history of popular culture. She also teaches chronological courses in United States history before 1865. Her current research analyzes the relationships between public power, urban landscapes, and community development and conflict. She is currently writing a book that uses New Orleans as a lens through which to examine the multi-ethnic, multi-racial, and multi-national world of the nineteenth-century urban streets.


Erik_Gellman

Erik S. Gellman
Associate Professor
U.S. History
Associate Director, St. Clair Drake
Center for African and African American Studies
egellman@roosevelt.edu

http://sites.roosevelt.edu/egellman/
College of Arts and Sciences
Department of History and Philosophy
Chicago phone: 312-322-7138
Chicago room: AUD839

 
Erik S. Gellman earned his B.A. from Bates College and Ph.D. in History from Northwestern University. Specializing in the 19th and 20th Century United States, Gellman's research interests include African American and working-class history, social movements, and comparative ethnic and racial studies. His recent publications include: The Gospel of the Working-Class: Labor’s Southern Prophets in New Deal America, coauthor Jarod Roll (Champaign, IL: University of Illinois Press, 2011), Death Blow to Jim Crow: The National Negro Congress and the Rise of Militant Civil Rights (Chapel Hill, NC:  University of North Carolina press, John Hope Franklin series, forthcoming 2011) and a chapter in the edited volume, Black Power at Work (Ithaca, NY:  Cornell University Press, 2010). Gellman’s special interest in Chicago's history has led to past work on the staff of the Encyclopedia of Chicago and The Labor Trail map project. He is academic director for the summer 2012 NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture grant on the Black Chicago Renaissance in the arts and also serves as an Illinois Humanities Council Road Scholar; co-convener of the Newberry Library’s Labor History Seminar; steering member of the Chicago Committee for Working-Class Studies; member of the Workers Rights Board of Jobs with Justice; and faculty-support committee for UNITE-HERE.

Carmen Kordick
Carmen Kordick
Assistant Professor
Latin American History
ckordick@roosevelt.edu
College of Arts and Sciences
Department of History and Philosophy
Chicago Phone:  312-341-2118
Chicago room: AUD 838B

Carmen Kordick holds a B.A. from the University of Colorado at Boulder, and her M.A., M.Phil., and Ph.D. from Yale University. She is an historian of modern Latin America, specializing in 20th-century Central America, Mexico and the Caribbean.  Her research and teaching interests include nation-building and state formation, gender and women, migration, revolution and revolt, the Cold War, and Latin American-U.S. relations. She is a pioneer in the field of Costa Rican immigration studies and has published a chapter in an edited volume on this topic, Shattering Myths on Immigration and Emigration in Costa Rica (Lanham, M.D.: Rowman and Littlefield/Lexington Books 2011.)  Currently, she is working on a monograph that narrates the history of Costa Rica’s famed, though historically remote, Tarrazú Valley.  Her study of this coffee region is grounded in the new history on gender and class relations in Latin America, and relies on oral histories as well as English and Spanish-language primary and secondary sources gathered over fifteen months in both Costa Rica and Paterson, New Jersey (the home of many Costa Ricans in the U.S.).  Her work explores the way individuals at the margins of state power (and beyond the nation’s borders) conceive the nation and the relationships they forge to national myths, identities, and ideals.   Her extensive research on Costa Rica’s1948 Civil War, gendered violence, political repression, migration, race relations, and class formation in the Tarrazú Valley promise to help dismantle Costa Rica’s exceptionalist mythology, which touts this Central American republic as the region’s whitest (i.e. European-American and non-indigenous) and therefore most egalitarian, peaceful, and democratic nation-state in the isthmus. Professor Kordick offers courses in modern and colonial Latin American History, Latinos in the United States, and U.S.-Latin American relations.


Margaret_Rung

Margaret Rung
Chair and Associate Professor U.S. History
Director of the Center for New Deal Studies
mrung@roosevelt.edu
http://sites.roosevelt.edu/mrung/
College of Arts and Sciences
Department of History and Philosophy
Chicago phone: 312-341-3724
Chicago room: AUD 834
 

Margaret Rung received her B.A. from Oberlin College, and her M.A. and Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University. Before coming to Roosevelt, she taught at Mount Allison University in New Brunswick, Canada and during the 2000-2001 academic year, she served as a visiting Fulbright lecturer at the University of Latvia in Riga, Latvia. At Roosevelt, she directs the Center for New Deal Studies and teaches courses that focus on this era. She also teaches broadly in American history, including courses on colonial North America, urban history, state building and the post-World War Two era.  Author of the book, Servants of the State: Managing Diversity and Democracy in the Federal Civil Service, 1933-1953 (Athens, GA: University of Georgia Press, 2002), her research examines politics and political institutions in twentieth-century America, and has appeared in journals such as Business History Review, Presidential Studies Quarterly and the American Review of Public Administration. In addition to numerous book reviews and a teaching manual, her other publications have focused on the New Deal. Currently, she is researching and writing about fair employment reform efforts in the United States and Canada from the 1930s through the 1960s.


D_Bradford_Hunt

D. Bradford Hunt
Vice Provost, Adult and Experiential Learning
Dean, College of Professional Studies
Professor
Social Sciences and History
dbhunt@roosevelt.edu
http://sites.roosevelt.edu/dbhunt/
Phone:  312-281-3145
Room:  GB 205-K

 

D. Bradford Hunt received his B.A. from Williams College and his Ph.D. in history from the University of California, Berkeley.  He holds a joint appointment with the College of Arts and Sciences, and currently serves as Vice Provost for Adult and Experiential Learning as well as Dean of the Evelyn T. Stone College of Professional Studies. His latest book, co-authored with Jon B. DeVries, is Planning Chicago (American Planning Association, 2013), an exploration of city planning in Chicago from 1958 to the present.  He has also written extensively on the history of public housing, including his book Blueprint for Disaster: The Unraveling of Chicago Public Housing (University of Chicago Press, 2009), which won the Lewis Mumford Prize from the Society of American City and Regional Planning History.  He is on the board of the National Public Housing Museum and serves as Membership Secretary for the Urban History Association.

 


Douglas_Knerr 

Douglas Knerr
Executive Vice President and University Provost
Professor
U.S. History
dknerr@roosevelt.edu

http://sites.roosevelt.edu/dknerr/
Phone: 847-619-7281
Room: WB1311

Douglas Knerr, University Provost, is a professor of history and has served on the Roosevelt faculty since 1998. Before joining the history department in 2007, he taught a variety of courses and seminars in the bachelor of general studies program in the College of Professional Studies. His research interests include the U.S. housing industry and the history of mid-sized corporations. His most recent book, Suburban Steel: The Magnificent Failure of the Lustron Corporation (Columbus, OH:  Ohio State University Press, 2005) looks at the intersections of housing technologies and social policy in the mid-20th century. Additional research interests include domestic culture and the evolution of residential interior spaces. He has held visiting appointments at several universities, most recently Case Western Reserve where he served as the Beamer-Schneider Fellow in the SAGES program. Professor Knerr received his B.A. in Political Science and his Ph.D. in history from the University of Cincinnati.


Charles R. Middleton

Charles R. Middleton
President
Professor
British History
cmiddleton@roosevelt.edu
President's page

Charles R. Middleton is President of Roosevelt University. Under Dr. Middleton's leadership, Roosevelt has gained a national reputation for being a fiscally disciplined organization that is committed to student success.

Since assuming the Presidency in 2002, Dr. Middleton has strengthened and expanded the University's curriculum through a thoughtful program review process that included the elimination of small programs and the strategic expansion of programs vital to today's marketplace. In addition, during this time the University has hired innovative college deans, created a new College of Pharmacy and appointed a record number of new full-time faculty members.

Perhaps his major accomplishment has been changing Roosevelt from a primarily commuter university with part-time adult students to a more traditional-age university where the majority of students are studying full-time with approximately 10 percent living in University housing. This was accomplished by revamping the University's student affairs programming and revising the University's recruitment strategies.

Under his guidance, credit hours taken by Roosevelt students have grown to the highest level in the University’s history. In addition, the University's retention and six-year graduation rates, the major indicators of student success, have improved dramatically.

Prior to joining Roosevelt, Dr. Middleton was Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs at the University System of Maryland, Provost and Vice President of Academic Affairs at Bowling Green State University and Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Colorado at Boulder.

A fellow of Great Britain’s Royal Historical Society, Dr. Middleton's academic expertise is in modern British history from the late 18th Century to the early 19th Century. During his career, he has taught more than 5,000 undergraduate and graduate students, written more than 70 scholarly papers and is the author of the book The Administration of British Foreign Policy, 1782-1846. Dr. Middleton earned an AB degree with honors in history from Florida State University and both an MA and PhD in history from Duke University.

Among many professional and civic commitments, Dr. Middleton is on the Board of Directors of the American Council on Education (ACE) and immediate past chair of the Federation of Independent Illinois Colleges and Universities. He also served on the board of the Chicago 2016 Olympic Bid Committee and serves on the boards of the Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt Institute in Hyde Park, N.Y., the Center on Halsted (where he chairs the Finance Committee and serves as Treasurer of the Center), the Chicago Central Area Committee, the Near South Planning Board, the Point Foundation and the Chicago History Museum Community Advisory Council. He is a member of Rotary One, the Economic Club of Chicago, the Executives' Club, and the Commercial Club of Chicago.


Lynn Weiner

Lynn Y. Weiner
University Historian
Professor
U.S. History
lweiner@roosevelt.edu
http://sites.roosevelt.edu/lweiner/
College of Arts and Sciences
Chicago phone: 312-341-2134
Chicago room: AUD806

Lynn Weiner, University Historian and former Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences (2001-2013), is also a professor of history at Roosevelt University as well as the Executive Director of the Center for New Deal Studies. She has been at Roosevelt since 1991. Before that, she taught for a year at Northwestern University. Professor Weiner also previously taught as an adjunct at Roosevelt and elsewhere. From Detroit, she has a B.A. from the University of Michigan in history and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in American Studies from Boston University.


Bruce Kraig
Emeritus Professor
U.S. History

Bruce Kraig holds a B.A. from the University of California, Berkeley, and an M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania in history and archeology. Professor Kraig has taught courses in history, prehistory, popular culture, the history of food, world cultures, film and television documentaries and travel and tourism, and continues to teach occasionally at Roosevelt. He has lectured on these subjects in the United States, Europe, Latin America, and Australia and has an international reputation as a food historian with special emphasis on the cultural significance of food. He has been the host, writer, and historian for the nationally broadcast Public Television (PBS) documentaries Hidden China, Hidden Mexico, Food for the Ancestors, Hidden India: The Kerala Spicelands, and Hidden Turkey, all done with his producer-director wife, Jan Thompson a Roosevelt alumna. The programs have won numerous awards, including: several EMMYs. Author of Mexican-American Plain Cooking (Chicago: Nelson-Hall 1982), The Cuisines of Hidden Mexico (New York:  John Wiley 1996) as well numerous articles on food and food history, world cultures and travel, Professor Kraig’s most recent book is Hot Dog: A Global History (London: Reaktion, 2009). He is editor of a food history book series for the University of Illinois Press, Senior Editor of the Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America and currently contracted for books on the social histories of hot dogs and the iconography of hot dog stands, an encyclopedia of world street food, and a history of food in America. He is the founding and continuing president of the Culinary Historians of Chicago and president of the Greater Midwest Foodways Alliance.


Christopher R. Reed
Emeritus Professor
U.S. History
creed@roosevelt.edu

Christopher R. Reed is both a Roosevelt alumnus and native Chicagoan who has matched scholarly interest and civic commitment. Returning to the university in 1987 as associate professor of history, he has also served as director of the St. Clair Drake Center for African and African American Studies. His research interests include Chicago history, nineteenth and twentieth century Black Chicago history, U.S. Civil War history, and urban politics. His scholarship includes numerous books and essays: Black Chicago's First Century, Vol. I, 1833-1900 (Columbia, MO: University of Missouri Press, 2005); "All The World Is Here": The Black Presence At White City (Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 2000); and, The Chicago NAACP And The Rise Of Black Professional Leadership, 1910-1966 (Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 1997); The Depression Comes to Chicago’s South Side: Protest and Politics, 1930-1933 (Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 2011); The Rise of Chicago’s Black Metropolis, 1920-1929 (Urbana, IL: University of Illinois Press, 2011); and Black Chicago in the Early Twentieth Century, 1901-1919 (De Kalb, IL: Northern Illinois University Press, forthcoming 2012). Along with research and writing, he serves as general secretary of the newly organized Black Chicago History Forum. He earned his B.A. and M.A. in history at Roosevelt University in 1963 and 1968 respectively and his Ph.D. from Kent State University in 1982.


Leon Stein
Emeritus Professor
Modern Europe
lstein@roosevelt.edu

Professor Leon Stein received his B.A. in 1962, his M.A. in 1964, and his Ph.D. in 1966 from New York University. He was the first Mansfield Professor of History at Roosevelt University, and he continues to teach select courses at the Schaumburg Campus. His teaching and research fields include History of the Holocaust, History of Ideas, Social Movements, and Nationalism. His many publications include numerous papers and articles on the Holocaust and the History of Nationalism, and a Curriculum on the Holocaust for the Public Schools of the State of Illinois. Professor Stein also contributed to the Illinois State Law that mandates the teaching about the Holocaust, and has conducted teacher institutes in which 1,500 teachers have been trained over the last twenty years. He has also completed a study comparing the behavior of the Lutheran churches in Germany and Denmark during the Holocaust.


Elizabeth Balanoff
Professor Emerita of History

 

Daniel Headrick
Professor Emeritus of History

 

David Miller
Professor Emeritus of History

 

Ronald Tallman
Professor Emeritus of History